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U.K. government blocks ban on dog meat in order to appease foreign ethnic groups


In order to not “offend” certain Asian cultures that prefer to eat their canines rather than have them as pets, the United Kingdom has decided to scrap a proposed ban on dog meat consumption, citing its “culturally insensitive” implications.

Great Britain’s Ministry of Justice (MoJ) reportedly blocked the initiative after being approached by “nervous civil servants” who expressed worry that Asians who live in countries where eating dog and cat meat is considered normal might become triggered by it.

Robert Buckland, the current head of the MoJ, led the move to stop the ban, which had earlier been proposed by Michael Gove, chief of the Cabinet Office. So, as of now, the U.K. will no longer be officially recognizing that it’s inappropriate to consume dogs anywhere outside of Asia.

“It’s not culturally insensitive because we’re not telling them what to do – we’re just telling them what we do,” stated Giles Watling, a Tory Member of Parliament who stands in defense of the ban on moral and cultural grounds.

“Dogs are our companion animals,” he added in a statement. “We do not eat them, and that is a very important message to send to the rest of the world.”

For more related news about the West’s continued capitulation to the cultural demands of foreigners, be sure to check out PoliticalCorrectness.news.

Asians themselves have expressed disappointment in the U.K.’s backtracking on this issue, as not all of them consume dog meat

In its attempt at political correctness, the MoJ has failed to set a precedent that even many Asians, including Kike Yuen from the World Dog Alliance, had hoped it would set.

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Speaking to the media, Yuen expressed disappointment that the U.K. didn’t follow through on its dog meat ban, as it would have set an example for the rest of the world to follow. This includes people in Asia who need to learn that dogs are not the same thing as cows or pigs, and shouldn’t just be thrown in meat grinders for sustenance.

“Legislation against dog meat in the U.K. would provide us with strength to continue our work in Asia, as the U.K. could influence other countries to stop dog meat consumption,” Yuen is quoted as saying.

“Most of them usually refused to do so with the excuse that there is no such law in Western countries,” he added.

Even as Great Britain couldn’t get the job done, Hong Kong, a former colony of the U.K., has banned dog meat, as has the independent Republic of China, which is more commonly known around the world as Taiwan.

“We currently have some of the strongest animal welfare laws in the world,” stated a Ministry of Justice spokesman in defense of the U.K.’s decision.

“The government is currently considering whether any changes are needed in this area in the U.K. and will set out any plans in due course,” it added.

As we’ve reported in the past, dog meat is big business in places like South Korea, where somewhere in the vicinity of 2.5 million dogs, at any given time, are chained up at 17,000 dog farms across the country, awaiting their slaughter.

South Korea is the only known country on earth where farming dogs for human consumption is done out in the open, as opposed to behind the scenes. But it certainly happens all across Asia, which has prompted many animal rights activists in these countries and elsewhere to form protests.

“Why do civilized people keep making excuses for barbaric behavior if brown and black people engage in it?” asked one Breitbart News commenter in response to this news.

“When are Western world governments going to look after their citizens above everyone else’s? It appears never,” commented another.

Sources for this article include:

Breitbart.com

NaturalNews.com



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