Research finds that eating breakfast helps obese people become more active


According to the results of a study, if you want to lose weight effectively and become more physically active, you shouldn’t skip breakfast. The study, which was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, a leading diet and nutrition journal, examined connections between breakfast and health for obese people.

The study involved health scientists working at the Department for Health who compared the test results of two sets of participants: a fasting group and a breakfasting group. For the study, both groups ate similar amounts of food overall.

Can breakfast promote physical activity?

Based on the results of the study, eating breakfast didn’t make obese individuals lose weight but it did help them become more physically active in the morning. Breakfast consumption also helped reduced food intake later in the day.

The researchers noted that since “[increasing] activity is one of the most important ways to improve health” in an increasingly sedentary population, educating the public about the benefits of consuming a healthy breakfast regularly may help promote proper nutrition and regular exercise. (Related: Eating breakfast before exercise may “prime” your body to burn more carbohydrates.)

The results of this study on an obese group of volunteers referenced data from earlier studies by researchers at the University of Bath regarding the effects of eating breakfast in a “lean” population. The two studies are part of the three-year Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)-funded “Bath Breakfast Project” (BBP).

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The combined results of these studies resulted in insights that are currently considered as “some of the most comprehensive to date into the effects of eating breakfast.” The study results also helped Dr. James Betts, the lead researcher of the BBP, win the prestigious Cuthbertson Medal from the Nutrition Society.

Researchers wanted to test for the potential connections among three factors: breakfast, body weight, and health. Dr. Betts said that even though many people have different opinions about “whether or not you should eat breakfast,” there is currently a lack of “rigorous scientific evidence” that proves how or even if eating breakfast could improve one’s health.

He noted that the study helped emphasize some of these impacts, but the importance of breakfast still “depends on the individual and their own personal goals.”

To illustrate, if a person wants to lose weight, there isn’t enough data to support the assumption that only eating breakfast or skipping it will significantly affect your weight. But Dr. Betts added that based on other markers of a healthy lifestyle, such as being more physically active or strictly controlling and monitoring blood sugar levels, there is sufficient proof that eating breakfast can help.

For the study, researchers conducted the obese trial by grouping participants, who were aged from 21 to 60, into two groups: “fasting” and “breakfasting.” The scientists measured the outcomes of the study during a six-week period.

The majority of existing research is limited to surveys of a large number of people. However, for this study researchers intensively tested a focus group in tightly-controlled conditions. This means the relevant effects of breakfast or fasting on the body can be studied without requiring data from thousands of people.

The breakfasting group was instructed to consume at least 700 kilocalories (kcal) by 11:00 a.m. The first half of the food for this group was consumed within about two hours of waking. The fasting group only consumed water until noon.

The participants were allowed to choose what they wanted to eat for breakfast, and the scientists wish to continue their research to determine if results will differ based on different breakfast types. Further study can help the researchers determine effective recommendations regarding the kind of food sources and nutrients that could best improve an individual’s overall well-being.

Food suggestions for a healthy breakfast

If you want to eat healthily, consider starting your day by combining some of the nutritious food options listed below:

  • Bananas – Bananas are rich in fiber but low in calories. Consuming foods rich in fiber may help slow the emptying of your stomach to minimize cravings and keep you feeling fuller longer.
  • Berries – Blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries are full of essential nutrients and low in calories.
  • Eggs – Eggs are full of protein and various vitamins and minerals, like riboflavin and selenium. The high protein content of eggs can also help reduce appetite if you eat them during breakfast.
  • Yogurt – Plain Greek yogurt is delicious and satisfying, making it the perfect addition to a weight loss diet. Greek yogurt is also rich in protein, and eating about seven servings of yogurt regularly has been scientifically proven to lower your risk of being overweight or obese.

You can read more articles about the importance of eating a nutritious breakfast at Slender.news.

Sources include:

Bath.ac.uk

Healthline.com



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